Booktube Made Me Do It (7)


Day 7 was to show where you’ve read. I have a reason why I didn’t follow through with posting every day of BookTubeAThon. My brother has been playing a lot of games on Xbox which has been using a lot of internet, so my mom and dad told him he needed to shut off the internet. What. Completely not fair, but it is what it is. So I can’t use internet until the 1st of August. I know, I know. That’s a long time, but I will make up for it during August :) So all my posts will be later. I will be doing my BookTubeAThon Wrapup post, my monthly wrapup and TBR, all my reviews, and the Rainbow Readathon TBR. Join me in the Rainbow Readathon and link your posts about it in the comments on any of my posts :) It’s an Instagram challenge so search #rainbowreadathon for the details on that. Oh, and you can tag me in any of your posts on Instagram about it if you’d like. My Instagram name is aubreybrowning. Anywho, the places I read were in my comfy bed, my living room couch, my car, and my living room floor. I don’t have any pictures, but that’s where I read :) Bear with me and my lack of wifi. I’ll be continuing with posts the first day of August.

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Booktube Made Me Do It (6)


Todays theme was 5 things from a book you’ve read this week. I picked 5 things from The Giver.

  1. Red hair – Fury cover (girl with red hair. obviously)
  2. Apple – ha ha I’m so punny
  3. A red book – Paper Towns because John Green is PERFECT
  4. Mom – because his mom is mentioned
  5. Dad – because is dad is mentioned

I know that people aren’t technically things, but I’m counting it :)

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Review: The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald


The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Title: The Great Gatsby

Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald

Release Date: September 30, 2004

Publisher: Scribner

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 180

Source: Bookstore

In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write “somethingnew–something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned.” That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald’s finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author’s generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s–and his country’s–most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter–tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning–” Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

It’s also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby’s quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair meet five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying, but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means–and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. “Her voice is full of money,” Gatsby says admiringly, in one of the novel’s more famous descriptions. His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy’s patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties, and waits for her to appear. When she does, events unfold with all the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama, with detached, cynical neighbor Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout. Spare, elegantly plotted, and written in crystalline prose,The Great Gatsby is as perfectly satisfying as the best kind of poem.

3 out of 5 stars

Plot:

Nick moves in next to the man who throws the parties, Jay Gatsby. Mr. Gatsby lives in a mansion across the water from Daisy Buchanan. This is no coincidence. Gatsby has been in love with Daisy since 1919 before he left for war. Daisy loved Jay Gatsby as well, but thought he died when he was at war. She fell for another man, married, and had a daughter. Jay comes back, but doesn’t tell Daisy. He builds a crazy huge mansion across the lake from her and throws huge parties every weekend in the hope that she’ll wander through his doors. She never does, but he sees her another way. Nick Carraway is Daisy’s cousin. Is it coincidental that Nick moved in right next to Gatsby? Maybe only F. Scott Fitzgerald will know. Nick is asked by Gatsby to have Daisy over for tea so he can see his one true love, Daisy Buchanan.

I honestly was only following this because I’ve seen the movie so many times. This book is really confusing. It takes multiple paragraphs to tell something that could be said in one sentence. I was expecting to love this book and be blown away, but I was kind of let down. I know so many people LOVE and rave about this book, but I’m not a huge fan. I love the movie. I love that era and the music and the fashion. I feel that I would have appreciated reading it more if I would have read it with classmates in school.

Characters:

Gatsby is a cool guy,but he’s so full of himself! He was asking way too much of Daisy when he told her to tell her husband that she never loved him and that she only loved Gatsby himself. That’s a ridiculous thing to ask! She didn’t even know he was alive, of course she fell in love again. Daisy was honestly my favorite, but she was whiny. I feel like during that time women were viewed as weak and whiny, though. I think she embodied being girly, but also having strong will and strong character.

Who Would I Be?:

I love Daisy. I would choose to be her. She’s kind of irritating, but she lived in a beautiful house, she was a stunning woman and she got to live in that time period. I love the Great Gatsby era. I honestly believe I was born in the wrong time.

 

Booktube Made Me Do It (5)


I know, I know. Bad blogger award goes to me. I was out of town yesterday so I didn’t have access to a computer. The struggle is real. But the theme for the fifth day of BookTubeAThon was a rainbow of your favorite books. So… I basically just made a rainbow. A lot of my favorite books are with my friends because I insisted that they read them.

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If I would have been using my favorite books The Fault in Our Stars would have been in there. But I have Love, Aubrey for red, City of Glass for orange, Everything on a Waffle for yellow (which is actually one of my favorite books), City of Bones for green, City of Ashes for blue, Shadow Kiss for purple (haven’t even read this one…. oops), and Lock and Key for pink.

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BookTube Made Me Do It (4)


This challenge was to write a story using all the words from three titles. I chose to use the books Where the Sidewalk Ends, The Wide Window, and Just One Day. My story:

Early one morning three sisters looked out the window from their shared bedroom. All they saw was the sidewalk. Just the sidewalk. The girls walked outside because of the nice weather. They decided it was a good beach day. The girls started to walk, but forgot where the beach was. They follow the sidewalk until they get to a wide clearing that was the local green space. They knew where they were. Just one more left turn until the beach. They took their left turn and walked onto the sand. Right where the sand ends, the water begins.

I know that was a horrible story with a horrible “plot line” but it was one of the challenges… :) BookTubeAThon has been really fun so far! Comment if you’ve participated in BookTubeAThon and what you’ve read!

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Review: Gathering Blue (The Giver #2) – Lois Lowry


Gathering Blue (The Giver Quartet #2) – Lois Lowry

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Title: Gathering Blue

Author: Lois Lowry

Release Date: January 1, 2000

Publisher: Ember

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 240

Source: Bookstore

In her strongest work to date, Lois Lowry once again creates a mysterious but plausible future world. It is a society ruled by savagery and deceit that shuns and discards the weak. Left orphaned and physically flawed, young Kira faces a frightening, uncertain future. Blessed with an almost magical talent that keeps her alive, she struggles with ever broadening responsibilities in her quest for truth, discovering things that will change her life forever.

As she did in The Giver, Lowry challenges readers to imagine what our world could become, and what will be considered valuable. Every reader will be taken by Kira’s plight and will long ponder her haunting world and the hope for the future.

4 out of 5 stars

Plot:

In a village there is a hierarchy. Our main character, Kira, is in one of the lowest branches. Kira lives with her mother, and her father is suspected to be killed by the Beasts that live in the Field. Kira is born with a twisted and crippled leg and was supposed to be sent out to the field as an infant, but her mother pleaded and begged to keep her at home. Her mother won that tiny battle, and Kira was kept at home. As infants the villagers are named a one syllable name, and as they age they add more syllables to their name. The oldest person in this book has a four syllable name. That four syllable name is the person that Kira visits to learn to dye thread and yarn. There is something special about Kira. She can embroider and weave. She is put in charge of fixing the Robe. The Robe is the story of their people. The Singer wears this special robe at the Gathering while he sings the history. Kira learns to make the colored threads, but doesn’t know how to make blue. Blue is the color she most desired to make, so her friend goes and finds the plant to create blue. Based on the reviews on Goodreads I was really skeptical. NO ONE LIKED THIS BOOK. I enjoyed this book. Everyone was freaking out that it wasn’t the world as The Giver, but it was. It wasn’t the advanced utopian world, but it was the dystopian side of it. If everything was as advanced as The Giver then it would be a completely different world. I loved that it showed the other side of the world.

Characters:

Kira had two friends. Matt who was in the lowest branch of the hierarchy, and Thomas, The Carver. Thomas carved wood like Kira embroidered. Kira and Thomas were lovable characters. Matt was so cute. It was unclear to how old he was, but he was adorable. He had a pet dog that he nurtured back to health, and he grew up in the Fen. Because he lived in the Fen he had a weird accent. He was probably my favorite character.

Who Would I Be?:

Even though Kira has a twisted leg, I’d choose to be her. I love sewing, and embroidery is kind of like that. She’s just a lovable character. She lost her mother, but she pushed through. She lost her dad, but she pushed through. She was such a strong main character.

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Booktube Made Me Do It (3)


Todays challenge for the BookTubeAThon 2014 video/blogging challenge was draw a new cover. I honestly accidentally did this. I was at work and it was really slow because it wasn’t a beautiful day, and I was at the front desk and I just started drawing. I LOVED The Giver so so so so so much. But the reason I didn’t read it before was BECAUSE OF THE COVER. It’s a creepy old guy. That’s it. *see here*

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Oh my gosh. I didn’t even think of him like this. The Giver was supposed to be a cool old guy who could see color! Not creepy. Anyway, I drew what I thought would be a pretty cool cover.

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