Review: The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events #4) – Lemony Snicket


The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events #4) – Lemony Snicket

The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events, #4)

Title: The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events #4)

Author: Lemony Snicket

Release Date: April 15, 2000

Publisher: Scholastic Inc.

Format: ebook

Page Number: 208

Source: Overdrive

Dear Reader,

I hope, for your sake, that you have not chosen to read this book because you are in the mood for a pleasant experience. If this is the case, I advise you to put this book down instantaneously, because of all the books describing the unhappy lives of the Baudelaire orphans, THE MISERABLE MILL might be the unhappiest yet. Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire are sent to Paltryville to work in a lumbermill, and they find disaster and misfortune lurking behind every log.

The pages of this book, I’m sorry to inform you, contain such unpleasantries as a giant pincher machine, a bad casserole, a man with a cloud of smoke where his head should be, a hypnotist, a terrible accident resulting in injury, and coupons.

I have promised to write down the entire history of these three poor children, but you haven’t, so if you prefer stories that are more heartwarming, please feel free to make another selection.

With all due respect,

Lemony Snicket


3 out of 5 stars

This was the first book that I borrowed from Overdrive, and I highly recommend using that app if your library offers it! It’s so cool because you just borrow ebooks from the library as if it were a normal physical book. It’s quite cool. Anyway, the book.

The Miserable Mill is the fourth installment in the Series of Unfortunate Events books, and this series hasn’t been enthralling me. I have rated each of these books 3/5 stars, so this one was pretty average for me. I didn’t love it, I didn’t hate it.

I always forget how incredibly short these books are. I finished half of this book yesterday, so it was a very quick read. I enjoy Klaus the most from the siblings. He’s the bookish one who usually defines words, but he was hypnotized for most of this book from the eye doctor.

These books are quite strange in their nature because they’re pretty morbid. They are funny at some points because there are jokes that are for the adults reading to the kids. I thought that there were some funny parts.

This book was about the Baudelaire kids having to work at a wood mill, and of course come across Count Olaf eventually. This was slower than the first three, and there wasn’t as much action, but I look forward to reading more of this series.

Series:

The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events #1)

The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events #2)

The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events #3)

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Review: The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events #3) – Lemony Snicket


The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events #3) – Lemony Snicket

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Title: The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events #3)

Author: Lemony Snicket

Release Date: January 1, 2000

Publisher: Harper Collins Publishers

Format: Paperback

Page Number: 224

Source: Book Store

Dear Reader,

If you have not read anything about the Baudelaire orphans, then before you read even one more sentence, you should know this: Violet, Klaus and Sunny are kindhearted and quick-witted, but their lives, I am sorry to say, are filled with bad luck and misery. All of the stories about these three children are unhappy and wretched, and the one you are holding may be the worst of them all.

If you haven’t got the stomach for a story that includes a hurricane, a signalling device, hungry leeches, cold cucumber soup, a horrible villain, and a doll named Pretty Penny, then this book will probably fill you with despair.

I will continue to record these tragic tales, for that is what I do. You, however, should decide for yourself whether you can possibly endure this miserable story.

With all due respect,

Lemony Snicket

3 out of 5 stars

Plot:

Violet, Klause, and Sunny have been sent to live with their distantly related Aunt Josephine. Count Olaf is still after them and will stop at nothing to obtain the family fortune. Mr. Poe, the man who is in charge of the legal affairs of the children, drops them off at their Aunt Josephine’s house on the top of a very large hill over looking a giant lake. Aunt Josephine shows them around the house and explains her fear of almost every object there. She doesn’t use the stove for fear that it will suddenly burst into flames, so they eat cold soup for dinner. She’s afraid of the furnace blowing up, so it’s always freezing in the house. The three children overlook her irrational fears because they’re just glad to be away from Count Olaf. Everything is semi-decent until they see him in disguise at the grocery store. What did he want with them now? Why did he always have to follow them?

This book has been my favorite of the series so far. It’s very obviously geared towards young children, but it’s still fun to read. I’m excited to see where the rest of the series will go. I really do wish that I would have read these books in late elementary school/early middle school, because I definitely would have enjoyed them more if I had.

Characters:

Violet is the inventor, Klaus is the reader, and Sunny is the one who bites everything. Klaus is my favorite because he is the one who reads all the books he can. I love books. he loves books, it’s a great deal. Count Olaf is mean, so he’s easy to dislike, but really, my least favorite character was Aunt Josephine. She was supposedly scared of everything, but how the heck did she get to the cave if she was so scared? I just feel like part of the explanation was missing.

Who Would I Be?:

I would be Klaus because we both love books and reading. I think I said this in the review of either the first or the second book, but I would love to have two siblings, as well. That would be pretty cool.

Series:

The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events #1)

The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events #2)

The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events #4)

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Review: The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events #2) – Lemony Snicket


The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events #2) – Lemony Snicket

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Title: The Reptile Room

Author: Lemony Snicket

Release Date: September 30, 1999

Publisher: Scholastic

Format: Hardback

Page Number: 192

Source: Bookstore

Dear Reader,

If you have picked up this book with the hope of finding a simple and cheery tale, I’m afraid you have picked up the wrong book altogether. The story may seem cheery at first, when the Baudelaire children spend time in the company of some interesting reptiles and a giddy uncle, but don’t be fooled. If you know anything at all about the unlucky Baudelaire children, you already know that even pleasant events lead down the same road to misery.

In fact, within the pages you now hold in your hands, the three siblings endure a car accident, a terrible odor, a deadly serpent, a long knife, a large brass reading lamp, and the appearance of a person they’d hoped never to see again.

I am bound to record these tragic events, but you are free to put this book back on the shelf and seek something lighter.

With all due respect,

Lemony Snicket

3 out of 5 stars

Plot:

Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire have had many unfortunate events happen to them. First their parents die in a fire, their house is burned down, and then they are forced to live with a horrible distant relative, Count Olaf. The children are taken from Count Olaf and brought to a nicer family member, Uncle Monty. Uncle Monty lives in a huge house with a lot of bedrooms and a reptile room filled with snakes and toads and frogs from all over the world. There are poisonous snakes and snakes who move half an inch an hour. Uncle Monty is planning to go explore the world and decides to go to Peru. The children are supposed to go on this trip with Uncle Monty and his new assistant, Stephano. The children are suspicious of Stephano and try to tell Uncle Monty what they think about him, but it soon becomes too late. I am enjoying this series. These are the books I imagine myself reading to my future children. These books are fun, easy, and quick reads. I wish I would have read them when I was younger, but I’m still enjoying them.

Characters:

I honestly love Violet, Klaus, and Sunny. I feel bad that their lives have been so unfortunate, but I still like them and enjoy reading about them. When I read this book I imagined reading it when I was younger, and found I liked it and enjoyed it more than the first book. Klaus loves reading, so it isn’t hard to choose my favorite of the Baudelaire siblings. Violet loves inventing and Sunny likes biting things. Some weird hobbies, but I don’t judge.

Who Would I Be?:

I would be Klaus. He loves reading and gets to read all the time. He’s also the middle sibling. I would love to have both an older and younger sibling. He is also the one who thinks everything through. Violet just jumps into everything, which isn’t a bad thing, but Klaus always thinks of the possible outcomes.

Series:

The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events #1)

The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events #3)

The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events #4)

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Review: The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events #1) – Lemony Snicket


The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events #1) – Lemony Snicket

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Title: The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events #1)

Author: Lemony Snicket

Release Date: September 30, 1999

Publisher: Harper Collins

Format: Hardcover

Page Number: 176

In this first book, readers are introduced to the unfortunate Baudelaire children — 14-year-old Violet, 12-year-old Klaus, and their infant sister, Sunny — when they learn they’ve just been orphaned by a terrible house fire.

The executor of the Baudelaire estate — a phlegm-plagued banker named Mr. Poe – sends the children to live with a distant relative: a conniving and dastardly villain named Count Olaf, who has designs on the Baudelaire fortune. Count Olaf uses the children as slave labor, provides horrid accommodations for them, and makes them cook huge meals for him and his acting troupe, a bunch of odd-looking, renegade good-for-nothings. When the children are commandeered to appear in Count Olaf’s new play, they grow suspicious and soon learn that the play is not the innocent performance it seems but rather a scheme cooked up by Olaf to help him gain control of the children’s millions.

All this bad luck does provide for both great fun and great learning opportunities, however. Violet is a budding McGyver whose inventions help the children in their quest, Klaus possesses a great deal of book smarts, and Sunny — whose only real ability is an incredibly strong bite — provides moral support and frequent comedy relief. Then there are the many amusing word definitions, colloquialisms, clichés, hackneyed phrases, and other snippets of language provided by the narrator (a character in his own right) that can’t help but expand readers’ vocabularies. Though the Baudelaire children suffer myriad hardships and setbacks, in the end they do manage to outsmart and expose Olaf’s devious ways. But of course, with luck like theirs, it’s a given that Olaf will escape and return to torment them again some day. If only misery was always this much fun.

3 out of 5 stars

Plot:

Three siblings lose their home and parents to a huge fire. A neighbor brings the kids to their closest living family member, Count Olaf. The kids have never met Count Olaf and have no idea how they are related to him. Olaf doesn’t really care about the kids, he just wants the fortune that has been left to Violet. He treats the children like pests and he doesn’t actually want them as children. The three siblings, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny, meet the nice neighbor of Count Olaf, Justice Strauss. She has a big library filled with thousands of books ranging from huge law books to books about animals, which interest Klaus. The three have to participate in a play and Count Olaf has other plans for making the play very special. I liked this book, but it wasn’t my favorite. I definitely wish I would have read this when I was much younger. I still liked it, but it is for a much younger audience.

Characters:

Violet, Klause, and Sunny are the three siblings and they have very unfortune things happen to them. Violet is the oldest and loves anything with engineering and building things. Klaus is the middle child and he likes books of any kind in general, and Sunny is the infant who likes biting everything. These three peculiar children have very bad luck and have to live with Count Olaf. Count Olaf is a rude and odd-looking man. He doesn’t treat any of the three children right, but he takes an odd liking to Violet. I liked these characters but Violet and Klaus were my favorite.

Who Would I Be?:

I would choose to be Klaus because he loves books and he likes learning things. I already love reading, so that wouldn’t even be a big change. Klaus is just a loveable character in general and I would love to have two sisters. I’ve always wished I had a sister, ad if I was Klaus I would have two.

Series:

The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events #2)

The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events #3)

The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events #4)

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